NASA shares incredible video of the site where Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon

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NASA has revealed incredible lunar video that zooms in on the lunar surface landing of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin – still visible 53 years after the Apollo 11 landing.

“Today marks the anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing – the first time humans stepped onto the surface of another world,” the space agency said. Twitter, noting that July 20 is International Moon Day. ‘This video from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter shows astronaut tracks still there after all this time.’

NASA has unveiled incredible lunar video footage that zooms in on Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin’s footprints on the lunar surface – still visible 53 years after the Apollo 11 landing. Armstrong made history on July 20, 1969, when he left the first human footprint on the lunar surface , in the image above

NASA marked International Moon Day by releasing a video zooming in on the footprints of its astronauts still visible on the lunar surface 53 years later

NASA marked International Moon Day by releasing a video zooming in on the footprints of its astronauts still visible on the lunar surface 53 years later

NASA notes that Apollo 11 is the most famous, but its previous missions paved the way for the famous landing — including robotic explorers like the Rover and Surveyor, and crewed missions like Apollo 8, 9 and 10 that attempted entry to and from the Moon. orbit.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has been exploring the moon since 2009 and has already returned more data to Earth than any other planetary mission by the agency: a staggering 1.4 petabytes.

For context, some estimates say that one petabyte is equivalent to 20 million tall filing cabinets or 500 billion pages of standard printed text.

NASA on Wednesday announced has chosen three possible dates for its Artemis I mission – the first phase of its efforts to send a woman and a person of color to the Moon.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has been exploring the moon since 2009 and has already returned more data to Earth than any other planetary mission by the agency: a staggering 1.4 petabytes.  This photo from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter video shows the astronaut tracks that are still there after all this time

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has been exploring the moon since 2009 and has already returned more data to Earth than any other planetary mission by the agency: a staggering 1.4 petabytes. This photo from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter video shows the astronaut tracks that are still there after all this time

NASA announced Wednesday that it has selected three possible dates for its Artemis I mission — the first phase of its effort to send a woman and a person of color to the moon.  The image above is a magnified image from the NASA video that was shared today

NASA announced Wednesday that it has selected three possible dates for its Artemis I mission — the first phase of its effort to send a woman and a person of color to the moon. The image above is a magnified image from the NASA video that was shared today

The U.S. space agency plans Aug. 29 to launch the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the Orion spacecraft from Kennedy Space Center — with Sept. 2 and 5 designated as backup launch dates.  The picture above shows the moon

The U.S. space agency plans Aug. 29 to launch the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the Orion spacecraft from Kennedy Space Center — with Sept. 2 and 5 designated as backup launch dates. The picture above shows the moon

The U.S. space agency plans Aug. 29 to launch the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the Orion spacecraft from Kennedy Space Center — with Sept. 2 and 5 designated as backup launch dates.

James Free, associate administrator at NASA headquarters in Washington, said the exact date will be set about a week before the launch.

Artemis I, which has suffered several delays over the past two and a half years, will finally launch the unmanned Orion capsule, which will fly around the moon and splash back into the Atlantic Ocean.

News of the official launch comes weeks after NASA conducted its latest ‘wet exercise’, which it deemed a success.

In 2019, NASA shared a series of stunning panoramic images to mark the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.

These amazing images of the Apollo landing site were made by combining existing photos to create a whole new way of looking at the lunar surface.

The individual images taken by the Apollo astronauts were stitched together by NASA imaging specialist Warren Harold and checked for accuracy by Apollo 17 astronaut and geologist Harrison ‘Jack’ Schmitt.

“The Taurus-Littrow Valley on the Moon presents a view that is one of the most spectacular natural scenes in the solar system,” Schmitt said of the images compiled from his Lunar Base Station 5 at the Taurus-Littrow landing site.

The individual images taken by the Apollo astronauts were stitched together by NASA imaging specialist Warren Harold and checked for accuracy by Apollo 17 astronaut and geologist Harrison 'Jack' Schmitt.  Pictured above: Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module Pilot, is seen walking near the Lunar Module during Apollo 11's extravehicular activity

The individual images taken by the Apollo astronauts were stitched together by NASA imaging specialist Warren Harold and checked for accuracy by Apollo 17 astronaut and geologist Harrison ‘Jack’ Schmitt. Pictured above: Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module Pilot, is seen walking near the Lunar Module during Apollo 11’s extravehicular activity

Pictured above is an original photo of astronaut Buzz Aldrin on the surface of the moon with an American flag planted in front of him

Pictured above is an original photo of astronaut Buzz Aldrin on the surface of the moon with an American flag planted in front of him

“The massive walls of the valley are brilliantly lit by the sun, rise higher than those of the Grand Canyon, and rise to heights of over 4,800 feet in the north and 7,000 feet in the south,” Schmitt added.

“At the same time, the peaks are set against a blacker sky – a contrast beyond the experience of visitors from Earth.

‘And over the wall of the southern massif in the valley we can always see home, the cloud-shrouded blue Earth, only 250,000 miles away.’

Throughout the week, NASA has been preparing a tribute to the astronauts who first stepped on the moon on July 20, 1969, almost 50 years ago.

Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first two men on the moon, and since then only ten others have followed – all Americans.

Michael Collins, their colleague who stayed in the Colombia module for 21.5 hours on the Moon, recently returned to the launch site at Cape Canaveral.

History of NASA’s Apollo program

The Apollo program saw a total of 11 space flights and the first man set foot on the moon.

NASA began the program, also known as Project Apollo, in 1961 with the sole mission of getting astronauts to the Moon and back to Earth safely.

Six missions (Apollo 11, 12, 15, 16 and 17) achieved this goal from 1969 to 1972.

Apollos 7 and 9 were Earth-orbiting missions that tested the Command and Lunar Modules, but did not return with data.

Apollos 8 and 10 tested various components while orbiting the moon, resulting in a photograph of the lunar surface.

Apollo 13 was supposed to touch down on the Moon, but technical failures occurred that hampered the mission.

A total of 12 astronauts left footprints on the lunar surface.

Although all missions will forever be a part of history, Apollo 11 is what first brought humans to the moon.

Apollo 11 was launched on May 25, 1961 by President John F. Kennedy.

He said: “We decided to go to the moon in this decade and do other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.”

Apollo 11 launched from Cape Kennedy on July 16, 1969 with Commander Neil Armstrong, Command Module Pilot Michael Collins, and Lunar Module Pilot Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin into an initial Earth orbit of 114 by 116 miles.

Armstrong and Aldrin spent 21 hours and 36 minutes on the lunar surface.

Re-entry procedures began on July 24, 44 hours after leaving lunar orbit.

Apollo 11 landed at 13 degrees, 19 minutes north latitude and 169 degrees, nine minutes west longitude on July 24, 1969.

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